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ISSN 1749-8155

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Review Date: 
1 Mar 2000

'From the Sea of Perpetual Gloom to the Holiday Cruise'

Review Date: 
1 Feb 2000

Joseph P. Huffmans Family, Commerce and Religion in London and Cologne: Anglo-German Immigrants, c.1000-c.1300: (Cambridge 1998) is the most recent contribution to a burgeoning field of historical scholarship, i.e. the study of Anglo-German relations in the Middle Ages. Over the last fifteen years a number of studies have appeared on the subject.

Review Date: 
1 Jul 1998

Recent years have seen a blossoming of secondary literature on medieval queens and queenship, a development which owes much to the impetus provided by Pauline Stafford’s path-breaking study, Queens, Concubines and Dowagers: The King’s Wife in the Early Middle Ages (1983). Several essay collections, including J. C. Parsons ed., Medieval Queenship (1993) and A. J.

Review Date: 
1 Jun 1997

We have never been less interested in the details of history than we are today, and we have never been more committed to a weak and often reductive view of a romanticized past.

Review Date: 
1 Jan 1997

''Five million barrels of porter'' (p. 140)

Review Date: 
1 Dec 1996

The study of the Black Death has undergone something of a renaissance in recent years. A flurry of articles (including J. Hatcher, 'England in the aftermath of the Black Death', Past and Present 144 (1994)), a selection of sources (R. Horrox, The Black Death (1994)) and two syntheses (this one and M. Ormrod and P.

Review Date: 
1 Nov 1996

Professor Fryde's new study represents a substantive - and substantial - contribution to the history of land tenure, economic change and social development in later medieval England.

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