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Response to Review of India Conquered: Britain’s Raj and the Chaos of Empire

During the last 20 years in the Anglophone world it’s been difficult to escape public argument about the morality of empire. From Niall Ferguson to Nigel Biggar, Seamus Milne to Shashi Tharoor, whether they think ‘Empire good!’ or ‘Empire bad!’, protagonists in the debate assume that ‘empire’ is a singular subject we are already familiarContinue reading “Response to Review of India Conquered: Britain’s Raj and the Chaos of Empire”

Response to Review no. 790

Philip Stern’s discussion of my book does everything an author can hope for in a review; it summarises the argument in a fluent and persuasive way, critically considers its broader implications, and offers a stimulating set of thoughts about further directions such an analysis might go. It would be an injustice therefore not to respondContinue reading “Response to Review no. 790”

Ideology and Empire in Eighteenth-Century India: the British in Bengal

In the course of a single generation, the British empire was transformed from being a network of self-governing Atlantic communities into a cluster of largely Asian territories acquired, for the most part, through conquest. As countless historians note, the second half of the eighteenth century saw an ‘epochal shift in world power’. For many scholarsContinue reading “Ideology and Empire in Eighteenth-Century India: the British in Bengal”

The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke Vol. VII, India: The Hastings Trial, 1788-1795

[References which begin with a Roman numeral are to the volume number and then page in the Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke. Other numerals are to end notes] In the course of his distinguished career thus far, Professor P.J. Marshall has produced a rich vein of scholarship on Britain’s relationship with India during theContinue reading “The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke Vol. VII, India: The Hastings Trial, 1788-1795”